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The way it used to be

Across The Counter

By Martha Williams, El Paso, Texas

Reprinted from February 1990

To the finely tuned ears of a jeweler, little phrases set the hairs on his neck into vibration. The most irritating phrase to me is “Say, I want to ask you a little favor.” This of course means, “I want you to do this for nothing and I want it quickly, immediately if not sooner and with a smile on your face.”   Another phrase is, “ I have a little job here, I could do it my myself if I had the proper tools.”  This of course means, “I have a complicated job, I want it done now and free and if I had all the tools you have I could not possibly do it myself.”  Another is, “Just hook this back together.”

The way it used to be

Across The Counter

By Martha Williams, El Paso, Texas
Reprinted from January 1990

Somewhere around 4 B.C., the planets Jupiter and Saturn formed a spectacular conjunction, which was interpreted by astronomers as heralding the arrival of a great leader. The Bible tells us wise men from the East (or from the Orient) set out in search of this king. It is not said how many wise men made the journey, but tradition has reduced the number to three.

The way it used to be

Across The Counter

By Martha Williams, El Paso, Texas

Reprinted from December 1989

RB is a mechanic and has never been much on the basics of Dale Carnegie, which teach one to give recognition to the customer or person one wishes to cultivate. In fact RB has never really cultivated anyone being a workingman, and as a family we have never been into civic groups or club activities. I see wives of other jewelers at ribbon cuttings etc., but I was always busy with less impressive activities such as PTA and church and at one time I had a group of children I hauled around for the church choir, but somehow civic activities have eluded us, I guess because we are non sophisticated. On the other hand I know the achievements made by others are very important to them and I made an effort to acknowledge these as I would see the customer and would read about them in the paper or see them on TV.

The way it used to be

Across The Counter
By Martha Williams, El Paso, Texas

Reprinted from November 1989

It was 9:20pm, and I was just finishing up the supper dishes, and wondering if I’d get to watch the late news and thinking about having to be at the dentist at 7am so I could be at the store by 8:30am, so I could mark some items and rearrange the storage closet before opening. Something fluttered through my mind about something a fellow at the beauty shop said last time I was getting my hair done. He was in the next chair getting a perm and when he found out what kind of business I was in he said I really had a soft job with good hours. Off hand I can’t remember why I didn’t get up and belt him one, but perhaps it was because I was afraid the curling iron might burn my neck.

The way it used to be

Across The Counter

By Martha Williams, El Paso, Texas

Reprinted from October 1989

Back when I first joined RB in the jewelry field I could read anything and could not understand what customers meant when they said they could not see the dials and therefore would not purchase the watch. I used to think how silly such an objection was and wonder why they just didn’t say they couldn’t afford it. Now that Mother Nature has been busy at work I find customers asking me why we carry so many large watches with such huge numbers. It has come to pass that I tend to stock watches more for their ability to be seen and utilized than style.

The way it used to be

Across The Counter
By Martha Williams, El Paso, Texas

Reprinted from September 1989

I was running the front counter the other day when a swarthy, young sailor ambled in. I was happy to see a prospective customer although somewhat taken by a sailor in uniform in our land-locked city.

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